Evelyn Doane - William Raveis Real Estate - Cape Cod



Posted by Evelyn Doane on 12/17/2017

The real estate market is filled with many high-quality residences, and after a comprehensive search, you've found a residence that fits your personal needs and budget perfectly. However, you may need to think twice before you submit an offer on this residence. There are many factors that homebuyers should consider before they make an offer on a house, including: 1. Neighborhood Ideally, you'll want to find a home in a community filled with friendly neighbors. But in many cases, homebuyers may focus exclusively on a residence and ignore the neighborhood entirely. Taking a walk around a neighborhood often allows you to get a better feel about what it is like to live in a neighborhood and may give you a chance to meet some of the neighbors as well. Also, a simple walk around the block will provide you with a better idea about whether a house's value may rise or fall in the foreseeable future. For instance, a neighborhood filled with houses with well-maintained front lawns, nearby parks and schools and other local amenities may prosper for years to come, and home values may rise in this neighborhood over the next few years. 2. Crime No one wants to live in an unsafe area, and you can learn about crime near a prospective home before you submit an offer on a residence. Contacting a local police station usually is a great idea for homebuyers who want to find out about crime statistics in a particular area. Furthermore, your real estate agent can provide insights into crime in a specific area and help you determine whether a particular house is the best option. 3. Traffic Although your dream home features all of the amenities you want, it might fail to provide you with quick, easy access to your office day after day. For example, traffic can be a problem if your house is located in or near a major city. And if you need to travel to work every day, it is important to understand how traffic could affect your daily commute. To better understand traffic patterns in a particular area, try driving to a residence at different times during the day. By doing so, you can learn about traffic patterns near a house and be better equipped to make a more informed decision about whether to submit an offer on a residence. 4. Taxes You've been pre-approved for a mortgage and have established a monthly budget for a new home, but taxes may vary depending on where you move. Thus, you'll want to learn as much as possible about potential taxes that you could face at a new residence before you submit an offer. Taxes may add up quickly, but homebuyers who budget accordingly can minimize the risk that they'll fall behind on tax bills. And with support from your real estate agent, you can learn about taxes that you may encounter if you purchase a particular residence. If you're fully satisfied with a residence after you consider the aforementioned factors, you'll be ready to submit an offer and move one step closer to moving into your dream house.





Posted by Evelyn Doane on 10/8/2017

A home showing represents a great opportunity for prospective homebuyers, as it enables homebuyers to get an up-close look at a residence and determine whether to make an offer on it. As such, it is important to prep for a home showing; otherwise, a homebuyer could miss out on a golden opportunity to find the right residence at the right time. So what should you look for during a home showing? Here are three factors that every homebuyer needs to consider: 1. A Home's Exterior Although the home you're visiting caught your eye as you drove past it in your car, you may notice problems when you take a closer look at the residence's exterior. For instance, cracks or chips in the driveway or along the front steps may need to be repaired and may impact the amount that you offer for a residence – or whether you decide to submit an offer at all. Of course, no home showing would be complete without checking out the condition of the house's siding and roof, either. If you're uncertain about the condition of these areas, be sure to ask the home seller's real estate agent for more information. By doing so, you can make a more informed decision about whether a particular residence is right for you. 2. A Home's Heating and Cooling System Ideally, you'll want a house that stays warm in winter and cool in summer. But in many cases, an old heating or cooling system may prevent a homeowner from maintaining comfortable temperatures inside a house at all times. Ask about the age of a heating and cooling system during a home showing. This will allow you to find out if this system will need to be replaced or repaired in the immediate future. Find out about the efficiency rating of a house's heating and cooling system as well. Remember, the higher a heating or cooling system's efficiency rating, the more this unit will be able to save a homeowner on his or her monthly energy costs. And if you find a home that boasts a high-efficiency heating and cooling system, you may be able to save money on your energy bills down the line. 3. A Home's Doors and Windows Do a home's doors and windows open freely? If not, they may be in need of serious repair, which ultimately could put a major dent in your wallet if you decide to purchase a particular residence. The costs to repair or replace defective doors and windows can add up quickly. Thus, you'll want to ensure that all of a house's doors and windows are in great condition before you purchase a residence, and you can learn more about their condition during a home showing. When it comes to finding the right house, you'll always want to consult with a reliable real estate agent, too. Your real estate agent is readily available to assist you in any way possible, and he or she will be able to help you discover a top-notch house that meets all of your needs. Spend some time getting ready for home showings, and you'll be prepared to find an excellent home that you can enjoy for years to come.





Posted by Evelyn Doane on 1/17/2016

You pack all of your belongings in a truck and hope for the best but even with the most careful movers, accidents can happen. Did you know that typical moving insurance barely covers your prized possessions in cause of a problem. Typical moving insurance pays about 60 cents per pound for damaged goods. So if you have a $1,000 item that only weighs 10 pounds you will get a whopping $60 back. To make up the gap you should consider purchasing moving insurance. There are several options for you to choose from: Full value insurance Full value insurance is the most expensive insurance because it covers your whole shipment. If anything is lost, damaged or destroyed, the movers can either offer to repair the item, reimburse you with cash or replace it with a similar item. Check the policy to see if there are coverage limits on certain items. Released value insurance Released value insurance is the most typical type of insurance. It usually covers goods for 60 cents per pound.  Released value insurance is usually offered at little to no cost to you. make sure to check your moving contract, some exclude coverage if you pack your own boxes. Third-party insurance If you choose the mover's released value option, you may want to opt for additional insurance  from a third-party. Under this type of coverage your mover would be liable for 60 cents per pound of damaged goods and the insurance company would pay any of the remaining costs. As with any contract make sure to read the coverage thoroughly so you can make an educated decision about what type of coverage you will have for your move.





Posted by Evelyn Doane on 10/25/2015

Many buyers today think buying a foreclosure means big savings and this can be true but buyers also need to be aware of potential pitfalls. A foreclosure takes place when a homeowner or property owner cannot pay the mortgage fees on the property and is forced to give up the property to the bank. First, potential buyers should know there are different stages of foreclosure.
  • Pre-Foreclosure
Pre-foreclosure stage is the earliest stage of foreclosure. Reaching pre-foreclosure status begins when the lender files a default notice on the property, which informs the property owner that the lender will proceed with pursuing legal action if the debt is not taken care of. At this point, the property owner has the opportunity to pay off the outstanding debt or sell the property before it is foreclosed. In this stage, many homeowners may opt for what is called a short sale. Many of these homes will sell for near their appraised values. Banks may be willing to negotiate on these properties but the process can be lengthy. Properties that sell at a 20 to 40 percent discount usually need repair or are in unstable communities.
  • Foreclosure Stage
If a property doesn't sell in pre-foreclosure, and the home owner actually defaults on his mortgage, the home goes to public auction. During this stage you can find the best bargains but it can be filled with unexpected changes and last minute details. Preparation, patience and knowledge are key here and remember if a property does go to auction it will go to the highest bidder which is often the bank.
  • Many auctions are canceled at the last moment as the property has been sold or payments reworked.
  • Court-appointed trustees only accept cash or cashiers' checks.
  • There's little time to arrange inspections, so bidders may have no clear idea of what they're buying.
  • Properties are sold "as is," without warranties. Sellers needn't disclose problems. Buyers may find themselves with unexpected and expensive repairs.
  • Post-Foreclosure
  • In the post-foreclosure stage, the lender has already taken control of the property. The home is then in the possession of the lender's REO (Real Estate Owned) department, or in the hands of a new owner or investor who purchased the property at auction. Lenders are typically extremely willing sellers, because an REO on the books is an obvious sign of having made a poor lending decision. Both the overhead and losses involved with an REO -- reflected in both the added reserves a lender must maintain as well as any potential property management fees incurred -- means the bank is likely a willing negotiator.
    • Bank will not agree to do any repairs; as-is sale.
    • Bank will usually require additional paperwork.
    • Bank cannot provide disclosures as to property history/condition issues.
    Bank foreclosure properties can definitely help you make a good buy in real estate properties and still have lots of savings. Doing your homework on the neighborhood, comparable sales and property condition are essential in making a good buying decision.





    Posted by Evelyn Doane on 10/4/2015

    Ever wonder how one property for sale stacks up next to another? Would you like to be able to compare properties for sale to properties that have already sold? Well, you can right here on this site! Go ahead search for a property and sign up for MLS Property Finder. MLS Property Finder will allow you to search comparable properties and even search sold properties. You can even put them in a handy grid to stack them up next to each other for an easy visual. Once you have signed up for MLS Property Finder search for any property. Then when you want to compare the property to others go ahead and click the compare button across the top of the listing sheet. Here is an example of what it looks like: You can compare to sold properties, refine your criteria by town, bedrooms, price and more. This is just one of the reasons why searching for homes on this website is easy, quick and provides you all of the necessary information when looking to making a purchasing decision.