Evelyn Doane - William Raveis Real Estate - Cape Cod



Posted by Evelyn Doane on 2/11/2018

Dusting is something we all should be doing on a regular basis, but we may dread it. You can make the dusting process a bit easier if you do it on a regular basis. Then, follow a few simple tips to make the entire cleaning process seamless form start to finish.  


To Dust Or Vacuum?


Which came first, the dusting or the vacuuming? It only makes sense to start dusting first, as some dust will fall to the floor as you’re going over everything in your home. You should vacuum up the floor after you have dusted so you don’t need to do double the work. 


Start At The Doorway


No matter what room you start with, the best strategy is for you to start at the doorway of the room and work your way inward. You’ll also want to start high in the room and work your way down. If you have ceiling fans, high beams in the room, or hanging lights, you’ll want to dust those first. Then, dust the tops of items like bookshelves, refrigerators, and other high items in the rooms. Next, you’ll dust countertops, end tables, television stands, and other similar height items. Finally, you’ll dust the baseboards and items closer to the floor. This formula for dusting is for more of a deep clean. You can do less steps on a regular basis in order to surface clean your home without the need for hours of dusting. 


Your Furniture Will Stay In Better Condition 


The more often that you dust and care for your furniture, the better off your furniture will be. Cleaning the furniture often will prevent scratches and blemishes, keeping these pieces from showing visible signs of aging, wear and tear. Deep cleans of your home will really bring back its shine.     


There’s a few key areas of your home that you shouldn’t forget to dust from time to time.  These include:


  • Vents
  • Walls
  • Corners
  • Doors and door frames
  • Moldings
  • Light fixtures


To prevent dust, there are also a few measures that you can take. Some of these ideas includes:


  • Use doormats
  • Change air filters often
  • Brush your pets
  • Keep windows closed


All of these measures can help to keep your home cleaner and allergen-free. We often think of dusting and cleaning the things that are right in front of us. Yet, most often, dust and dirt are hiding in the places we least expect them to be. If we stay on top of cleaning, and do deep cleanings in our homes every so often, we’ll be able to keep dust and dirt away.





Posted by Evelyn Doane on 11/12/2017

When you’ve gone through the lengthy and tiring process of seeking out, bidding on, and buying a new home and then sell your home, the last thing you want to worry about is cleaning your old house before you leave.

 However, there’s multiple reasons you’ll want to ensure your old house is clean before you leave. First, as a common courtesy, you’ll want the new owners of your home to have a good first experience and to maintain your rapport with them after closing day. However, there are also legal and financial issues at play.

If your contract states that your home needs to have been “broom-swept” or some other form of cleaning before you leave, then your new owners could technically postpone closing. Furthermore, some states have laws requiring that homes are cleaned by their previous owners before they move out.

 Although it can be difficult to define just how clean a home needs to be, legally speaking, your best option is to do your part to leave the home relatively clean, whether that means cleaning it yourself or hiring a cleaning company.

Legal reasons for cleaning your old house

As mentioned earlier, some states state cleaning requirements in the purchase contract when you sell your home. Their definitions of clean can often be vague, but usually include sweeping floors, wiping down surfaces, stripping nails and hangers from walls, and carrying out all furniture and garbage.

These rules are mostly designed to protect people who purchase a home from getting stuck with bulk items and other surprise issues that they’ll have to pay for.

An exception to this is when your home is sold “as is” or when you have some form of written agreement between you and the new owner that some part f your home will be left as is.

Cleaning your house

The ideal time to clean your house is once you’ve moved everything out. However, if you’re moving over a long distance, you might not be able to return to the house once it’s empty to give it a final cleaning.

In this case, your best option is to have your furniture and boxes packed away neatly in the garage, or in the corner of one room. Doing so will allow you to sweep, clean surfaces, wipe down cabinets, and so on, while your belongings are still in the house.

Just be sure to keep a broom handy once you’ve put everything on the moving truck so you can give one last sweep of the floor before you say goodbye to your old home.

Cleaning checklist

It can be difficult to keep track of everything you’ll want to clean before you move out, so here’s a list to go by:

  • Sweep all floors

  • Vacuum all carpets

  • Wipe down cabinets, shelves

  • Try to sweep under appliances, oven, etc.

  • Spray sinks and tubs, leave air freshener in bathroom

  • Wipe inside of refrigerator, if applicable

  • Remove all nails from walls

  • Do a final walkthrough and remove any trash you’ve missed